French Food – Le Physalis Restaurant http://lephysalisrestaurant.com/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 07:31:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-140x136.png French Food – Le Physalis Restaurant http://lephysalisrestaurant.com/ 32 32 Moroccan-Belgian directors “shocked” by Warner Bros. to remove “Batgirl” https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/moroccan-belgian-directors-shocked-by-warner-bros-to-remove-batgirl/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 07:31:45 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/moroccan-belgian-directors-shocked-by-warner-bros-to-remove-batgirl/ DUBAI: A new Arabic word has entered the 2023 edition of the famous French dictionary “Le Petit Robert”, compiled by lexicographer Paul Robert in the 1960s. The word is “labne” or “labneh”. Derived from the Arabic word “laban” (yogurt), it is a creamy yogurt cheese that is a staple of a typical Levantine breakfast. “I […]]]>

DUBAI: A new Arabic word has entered the 2023 edition of the famous French dictionary “Le Petit Robert”, compiled by lexicographer Paul Robert in the 1960s. The word is “labne” or “labneh”.

Derived from the Arabic word “laban” (yogurt), it is a creamy yogurt cheese that is a staple of a typical Levantine breakfast.

“I am happy and proud that parts of our products, dishes and traditions are recognized internationally, and particularly in France,” Franco-Lebanese chef Karim Haidar told Arab News. “Adding a new kind of cheese to cheese country is amazing.”

The Paris-based chef said the decision came as no surprise as over the years his French customers and friends have come to love labne, which can be found in countless restaurants and delicatessens across the region. French capital. Not only does it taste good, but it has health benefits because it’s high in protein and calcium, he said.

According to Haidar, labneh is traditionally made with goat’s milk. It has great acidity, prepared in terracotta, rolled into small balls, then preserved in olive oil. Labne can also be prepared with sheep’s and cow’s milk.

While labne can usually be found in any supermarket in the Middle East, preparing labne at home is easy – just add salt to yogurt and strain it through a cloth overnight.

It can be consumed in several ways. Whether eaten as a take-out sandwich or as a dip, it is drizzled with olive oil and often garnished with zaatar, mint or sumac. In recent years, international chefs have incorporated labneh into dessert dishes.

The introduction of labneh in “Le Petit Robert” comes at a time when Lebanese immigration to France has increased in recent years due to the economic crisis affecting Lebanon. But Haidar believes that the interest of the French for this yogurt goes back a few decades.

“I don’t think the latest episode of Lebanese emigration had an effect,” he said. “Labné has arrived on French tables since the emigration of 1975. We have been witnessing for years the love of the French for labné, and French food culture has been open to foreign food cultures for 30 years. Much like mozzarella or parmigiano, you can now find labne on the shelves of some major supermarket chains. »

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Marianne Wiggins on Ending a Novel After Suffering a Stroke and Finding Inspiration in California’s Dry Terrain ‹ Literary Hub https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/marianne-wiggins-on-ending-a-novel-after-suffering-a-stroke-and-finding-inspiration-in-californias-dry-terrain-literary-hub/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 09:02:42 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/marianne-wiggins-on-ending-a-novel-after-suffering-a-stroke-and-finding-inspiration-in-californias-dry-terrain-literary-hub/ Properties of thirstthe new novel by Marianne Wiggins, whose Evidence of unseen things was a Pulitzer Prize finalist, is a complex, in-depth and captivating novel. It’s huge in scope – an emotionally satisfying family saga, an exploration of 20th century homelessness and the taking, insightful insight into the filming of early Hollywood Westerns, and the […]]]>

Properties of thirstthe new novel by Marianne Wiggins, whose Evidence of unseen things was a Pulitzer Prize finalist, is a complex, in-depth and captivating novel. It’s huge in scope – an emotionally satisfying family saga, an exploration of 20th century homelessness and the taking, insightful insight into the filming of early Hollywood Westerns, and the story of the effects of government policies on individuals. such as the diversion of water from California’s Owens Valley to Los Angeles and the internment of thousands of Japanese Americans during World War II at Manzanar and other hastily built and uninhabitable camps.

Virtually every page offers poetic language, conceptual surprises, striking sensual details. It’s a sensational, almost miraculous achievement, completed after Wiggins’ massive stroke in 2016. Marianne’s responses are in quotes because they were addressed to her daughter, Lara, who has been by her side throughout throughout his recovery and the completion of the novel.

*

Jane Ciabatari: Congratulations on completing Properties of thirst despite having a massive stroke in 2016 when you only had a few chapters to go. How did you spend your time recovering from the stroke, finishing the novel, and preparing to launch it, all while dealing with the ongoing pandemic?

Marianne Wiggins: “Since my stroke, I have had a lot of free time, most of which is devoted to healing exercises and therapy. What usually happens after I finish a novel is that I need to fill the empty space in my head, but life has provided me with new things to focus on, like learning to walk again – my Healing protocols now take up most of my time. These therapies take place at my daughter Lara’s home (she’s typing this for me as I speak), so being housebound was already in place before the pandemic. The peak of the pandemic coincided with my 24/7 care regime, the difference being that my daughter was now always at home – the pandemic gave me the opportunity to have the help of my daughter to engage my
words on paper to complete the novel.

I wanted to write a book about California and water scarcity since I arrived from England where it rains all the time.

JC: What inspired Properties of thirst? What inspired you to write about this area (the Owens Valley), this time (primarily the 1940s), the Lone Pine rancher fighting the water utility’s appropriation of waters of Los Angeles, the story of Manzanar, the Japanese-American internment camp where 10,000 were detained during World War II?

MW: “I was amazed to discover Manzanar as a National Historic Site on a road trip my daughter took me to when I moved to California from England. I was amazed to discover that we, as a nation had interned our fellow citizens of Japanese descent during World War II. I had never been taught that and didn’t know it either. I wanted to write a book about California and the water shortage ever since arriving from England where it rains all the time. I usually take a historical event and then populate it with my characters. When I saw the scenery surrounding Manzanar in the Owens Valley, I knew it there was a story to tell, I felt it on my skin.

JC: In Evidence of unseen things, a Pulitzer finalist, you write about the rise of nuclear science after World War I to the airdrop of “Little Boy” on Hiroshima – about “the physics and writing of nuclear fission…and about the way the government blatantly and quietly lied to us,” as you put it in an interview. In your new novel, the rising value of water in a time of extreme drought today is palpable in your descriptions of the Owens Valley with its natural waters diverted by “river piracy”, leading to “decapitated lands”. Why did you choose The Properties of Thirst as the title of your new novel?

MW“My original working title for the novel was Six Miles South of Independence, it’s the location of Manzanar, California, and I liked the pun. As I delved deeper into my work, I needed a broader title, which suggested it would be a book about WATER.

JC: You structure the novel by section headings, from “the first property of thirst is an element of surprise” to “the last property of thirst is evaporation”. Can you explain the origin of these definitions of thirst?

MW“I was trying to match the emotional territory of my character’s storytelling to the elements of landscape and thirst. When I write, I see each page of the book as a canvas and I like to put sentences with brush strokes – in John Dollar I played with side notes and in Eden without watch I’ve played around with running titles – I’ve taken a word or phrase from each page and placed it above the text in the corners of the “running titles” pages – I think these margin notes and headings current ones, as well as the chapter titles in Properties of thirstprepares the ground for what must be played out in the text.

JC: What was your research process for this novel? What was most useful to you – documents, oral histories, travels, archives, history – when you created the world of the Rhodes family – Rocky, influenced by Thoreau, who leaves the East to establish a ranch in the wild desert from Lone Pine, California in the Inyo Mountains; his twin sister Cas, his French-born wife Lou, who died of polio when their twins, Sunny and Stryker, were toddlers – and visitors like Chicago-born Schiff from the Department of the Interior, who participates in the creation of Manzanar shortly after Pearl Harbor?

When I write, I see each page of the book as a canvas and I like to put sentences with brush strokes.

MW: “Seeing the topography on that original trip was the stage setting. That came first. Then I started reading about the historical development of Los Angeles and the prejudice on the ground in the United States against the Japanese after Pearl Harbor and those two things lit the fuse. To answer your question, I love traveling and reading stories written as part of my research.”

JC: In 1912, during his first visit to the Sierra Nevada, Rocky camped near Lake Owens and saw thousands of snow geese melting on the water. Then Teddy Roosevelt granted his “executive privilege” to divert water to LA – “The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.” Once the water from the valley was diverted to Los Angeles, when the snow geese attempted to land on their annual migration, they hit crusted salt, breaking their legs. Later, the poisonous dust becomes a health hazard to the inhabitants of the valley and the internees of Manzanar. What was involved in developing the narrative thread about the roots of California’s current water crisis?

MW: “It was a decades-long learning process for me. I was born and raised on the east coast where it rains all the time, then spent much of my adult life in England where it also rains all the time – heavy rain! So experiencing extreme drought was new to me when I moved to California. I had visited the Sahara and Egypt but did not understand that there was American deserts so when my daughter moved to California, the first time I visited her, I came by train because as an expat, I wanted to see all of my country—and that opened up my eyes on the changing topography and climate we experience as a unified nation.You cannot live in Southern California without knowing the severe water limits.

JC: Your opening line – “You can’t save what you don’t love” – ​​echoes throughout the book, Rocky’s comments about the land he fights to save through Schiff’s feelings towards Sunny. How did this chorus evolve?

MW: “I did it! I think that’s what Rocky means to me. He came out of Rocky Rhodes. He came to know his character. He’s got a hook and a springboard so that’s a front line perfect! That’s the springboard… if I were to give a speech for example, that opening line would reveal 30 different perspectives, different narratives. It made sense to bring it back to the end. That’s what I think of when I’m thinking of Rocky Rhodes. And relationships could be saved if we could all love – you can’t save a relationship without love. When I use ‘save’, I’m using it as a guardian of life.

I wait for my dreams to stimulate my imagination, to receive inspiration.

JC: As a counterpoint to thirst, food is a major element of this novel. French cuisine, taken from the cookbooks and recipe box of Sunny’s mother, Lou, with notes in purple ink. Haute cuisine served in private dining cars, on cruises, in New York and Paris, when Sunny’s aunt, Cas, took her on a trip at age twelve. The food Sunny cooks for Lou’s, the restaurant she names in honor of her mother, where she uses local vegetables and game (duck rillettes, trout dumplings), to serve ranchers and service employees waters and Hollywood film crews. Food prepared on the ranch, from tacos and chicken soup, which Schiff and Cas make together, through a menu of green salad, elk terrine, soufflé, burgundy. How did you develop this theme?

MW: “A writer’s day is all about eating and drinking a lot! I write by hand and all my notebooks have food and drink stains, mostly pasta sauces and red wines! I love to eat. Writing is a lonely pursuit and the dinner bell is something to look forward to! My father was a grocer and my mother’s father was a grocer. Food is part of my vocabulary, it’s in my DNA and I love to cook. I also collect cookbooks, everything from Escoffier to Betty Crocker. I don’t watch much TV, but I love the big cooking shows. Since my stroke, I have watched all of Anthony Bourdain’s shows and the “Chefs Table” documentary series.

JC: The food theme also underscores the novel’s love stories “Show me what you eat and I’ll tell you who you are,” Schiff thinks at one point; Sunny’s food immediately appeals to her. Cas is captivated by Lynwood, a visitor who becomes a collaborator, after he prepares a memorable gin martini – like a “Norwegian fjord in the middle of winter”, with bay leaf, juniper berries, coriander, mustard seeds, a “exhalation” of vermouth, a blue borage flower and a single flake of salt, “the iceberg”. Did you have that in mind from the start?

MW: “Yes. I like to drink and I live to eat. I invented this recipe – my first adventure in mixology.

JC: What are you going to work on next?

MW: “Walking independently and living life outside of a diaper!” I wait for my dreams to stimulate my imagination, to receive inspiration. I also read a lot of non-fiction to see what triggers. I never know when or where a great story will reveal itself to me.

__________________________________

Properties of thirst by Marianne Wiggins is available at Simon & Schuster.

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This pickle pizza recipe, with Canadian bacon and dill, is a winning combo https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/this-pickle-pizza-recipe-with-canadian-bacon-and-dill-is-a-winning-combo/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 16:48:28 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/this-pickle-pizza-recipe-with-canadian-bacon-and-dill-is-a-winning-combo/ Thin Crust Pickle Pizza Active time:30 mins Total time:40 minutes, plus 30 minutes to preheat the oven Servings:2-4 servings (makes a 12 inch pie) Active time:30 mins Total time:40 minutes, plus 30 minutes to preheat the oven Servings:2-4 servings (makes a 12 inch pie) Comment this story Comment Pickles on the pizza? You’ve probably seen […]]]>

Thin Crust Pickle Pizza

Active time:30 mins

Total time:40 minutes, plus 30 minutes to preheat the oven

Servings:2-4 servings (makes a 12 inch pie)

Active time:30 mins

Total time:40 minutes, plus 30 minutes to preheat the oven

Servings:2-4 servings (makes a 12 inch pie)

Comment

Pickles on the pizza? You’ve probably seen this filling popping up on pies all over the country. We were inspired to create our own after tasting Quad City Pizza’s “Kinda Big Dill” pie in Minnesota.

Mornay sauce was adapted from Jacques Pépin’s recipe in “A French chef cooks at home”. We reduced the yield of the sauce (and added a little garlic), but there may still be some left. Use it to make another pizza or to season vegetables, or to top eggs, chicken or fish. Plus, it freezes beautifully.

We preferred this thin crust pie, but if you want to emulate the Quad City dough, make the one included in this recipe, Quad Cities-Style Pizza. For a thicker crust, use 1 pound rather than 1/2 pound of dough. You will need to increase the cooking time, to 13 to 15 minutes.

Also, we found store-bought sliced ​​pickles too thick for this use, so we bought whole dill pickles and sliced ​​them about 1/8 inch thick.

Make the pizza vegetarian or add thinly sliced ​​bacon or Canadian ham. To save time and effort, use store-bought batter and substitute store-bought alfredo sauce for the mornay.

Storage: Leftover pizza can be refrigerated for up to 4 days. Mornay sauce can be refrigerated for up to 2 days or frozen for up to 2 weeks. If frozen, thaw in refrigerator; then whisk or stir until smooth. No need to reheat, if you use it for pizza. If using as a topping for other foods, reheat in a heavy saucepan over low heat, stirring occasionally, until just warmed through.

Do you want to save this recipe? Click the bookmark icon under the serving size at the top of this page, then navigate to My Reading List in your washingtonpost.com user profile.

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  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced or finely grated
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • All-purpose flour, for dusting
  • 1/2 pound store-bought pizza dough (see main note)
  • Vegetable or olive oil, for brushing the dough
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill leaves, divided, plus more as needed
  • 6 slices (1 3/4 ounces) finely cut Canadian bacon or boiled ham, optional
  • 1 1/4 cups (4 ounces) coarsely grated part skim mozzarella cheese, plus more if needed
  • 1 1/2 large dill pickles (about 1 1/2 ounces), thinly sliced, plus more as needed (see main note)

At least 30 minutes before ready to bake, place a pizza stone or large inverted-rimmed baking sheet on a rack in the top third of the oven; preheat to 475 degrees.

Make the sauce: In a heavy saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. Stir in flour until smooth and cook, stirring constantly, until bubbly and foamy – do not let brown – about 1 minute. Add milk, whisking constantly, until boiling, about 2 minutes. Reduce heat to low and stir in garlic, salt and pepper. Cook, whisking constantly, until slightly thickened, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat and let cool for about 2 minutes. Add the egg yolk, whisking briskly to prevent curdling, then whisk in the cheese. (You should have about 1/2 cup.)

Lightly dust your work surface with flour and place a large sheet of parchment paper nearby. Using a rolling pin, roll out the pizza dough into a 12-inch circle or square. Gently slide the parchment under the shaped dough.

Spread a thin, even layer of sauce over the crust, leaving about 1/2 inch from the bare edge. (You’ll probably use a generous 1/4 cup, so reserve the rest for another use (see note). Brush the edges of the crust with the oil. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon dill over the sauce, then arrange the Canadian bacon or ham, if using, on top. Top evenly with mozzarella to the edge of the crust. Arrange the pickle slices around the pie and sprinkle generously with the remaining dill.

Slide the pizza with the parchment onto a pizza peel or rimless baking sheet, then transfer it to the heated pizza stone or baking sheet. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until cheese is bubbly and lightly browned and crust is lightly browned around edges.

Remove the pizza from the oven and slide it, still on the parchment paper, onto a cutting board. Sprinkle with fresh dill, if desired, let stand for about 2 minutes and serve.

Per serving (2 slices), based on 4

Calories: 303; Total fat: 13 g; Saturated fat: 6g; Cholesterol: 78mg; Sodium: 1207mg; Carbohydrates: 33g; Dietary fiber: 2g; Sugar: 4g; Protein: 15g

This analysis is an estimate based on the available ingredients and this preparation. It should not replace the advice of a dietitian or nutritionist.

Recipe editor Ann Maloney’s pizza recipe. Mornay sauce adapted from “A French Chef Cooks at Home” by Jacques Pépin (Touchstone, 1980).

Tested by Ann Maloney; questions by e-mail to voraciously@washpost.com.

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Sauce Magazine – St. Louis-based Essentially Fries food truck no longer works https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/sauce-magazine-st-louis-based-essentially-fries-food-truck-no-longer-works/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 16:01:40 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/sauce-magazine-st-louis-based-essentially-fries-food-truck-no-longer-works/ St. Louis-based Essentially Fries food truck no longer works By Alexander Olson // July 29, 2022 Matthew Borchardt, owner and operator of Essentially Fries, has ceased operations of the fries-focused food truck. Essentially Fries has been serving hand-cut fries in the St. Louis area since 2017, but maintaining the truck has been difficult since the […]]]>

St. Louis-based Essentially Fries food truck no longer works

Matthew Borchardt, owner and operator of Essentially Fries, has ceased operations of the fries-focused food truck.

Essentially Fries has been serving hand-cut fries in the St. Louis area since 2017, but maintaining the truck has been difficult since the pandemic hit. “I had no staff to operate the truck and it just sat in my driveway, generating no revenue,” Borchardt said.

Along with not having enough manpower, the cost of supplies like oil became unreasonably high for the truck. “It’s a fries truck, of course, and we use a lot of oil. And before the pandemic, oil was $17 to $19 a can and now it’s $47 to $55 a can,” Borchardt said. “Hard to justify this kind of increase.”

Juggling both the flagship restaurant, Edibles & Essentials, and the food truck, Borchardt decided to move on from Essentially Fries, ceasing operations on July 1. you know,” Borchardt said.

There’s still a chance to sample the Essentially Fries menu with pop-ups slated for next month at Edibles & Essentials at 5815 Hampton Ave. Food truck menu items will be offered again, this time indoors and with a full bar, on Wednesday August 17th and Wednesday August 31st. Full menus will be posted on Edibles & Essentials and Essentially Fries social media accounts ahead of pop-ups.

There may still be hope for Essentially Fries to return one day. “The food truck could make a comeback. I mean, I kept the brand, I only sold the physical truck. So we’re going to keep the brand alive,” Borchardt said. “Maybe one day I’ll buy another truck.”

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How to make an omelet https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/how-to-make-an-omelet/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/how-to-make-an-omelet/ Classic Folded Omelet Total time:15 minutes Servings:1 to 2 Total time:15 minutes Servings:1 to 2 Comment this story Comment At hotel breakfasts, fancy brunches, or even the college dining hall, the omelet station has always struck me as the height of luxury. Omelettes also hold a revered, almost mythical position in popular and culinary culture, […]]]>

Classic Folded Omelet

Total time:15 minutes

Servings:1 to 2

Total time:15 minutes

Servings:1 to 2

Comment

At hotel breakfasts, fancy brunches, or even the college dining hall, the omelet station has always struck me as the height of luxury. Omelettes also hold a revered, almost mythical position in popular and culinary culture, whether it’s the hypnotic comfort of famed French chef and cookbook author Jacques Pépin demonstrating his recipe or watching Helen Mirren’s character discover happiness. of a masala omelet made by the aspiring chef. played by Manish Dayal in “The Hundred-Foot Journey”.

But cooking a great omelette at home doesn’t have to be shrouded in mystery. If you’re already confident in your scrambled eggs, you’ve done almost everything. In “CookWise,” Shirley O. Corriher explains, “Basically, omelets are glorified scrambled eggs. They start the same, then when the eggs are partially set but still juicy, they are folded over.

How to Make Great Scrambled Eggs, Just the Way You Like Them

This means that many of the same tips I shared almost two years ago in my much-discussed article on scrambled eggs also apply here.

For me, that advice is exemplified by this classic folded omelette, a mash-up of recipes from chef and cookbook author Michel Roux and cookbook author J. Kenji López-Alt, plus some of my personal modifications. . Think of it as a cross between a French omelette and a dinner-style omelette. It has the smooth, creamy texture of the French version, with the folded appearance and filling versatility of what you might get at a casual restaurant. For me, it’s the best of both worlds.

Here are some of the keys to its success, which can help you with your omelettes, whether you make this specific recipe or not.

Choose the right skillet. There are two parts to this. Eggs tend to stick because, in their liquid form, they can flow into any microscopic surface imperfections, Corriher explains. For this reason, I turn to my non-stick skillet. If you have a well seasoned cast iron skillet you are sure the eggs won’t stick, by all means use it.

Why food sticks to your pans and what you can do about it

The other half of the equation is choosing the right size pan for the job. I really love my new 8 inch skillet for individual or 2 serving omelets. It prevents eggs from spreading too thin and overcooking. It is also very easy to maneuver. If you’re looking for larger omelets to share, consider using a 10 inch for 4 or 5 eggs and moving up to 12 inch for 6 or more eggs.

Salting. López-Alt is the one who sold me the salting of eggs a little before the time you cook them. This gives the salt time to dissolve evenly so it can act as the most effective buffer between the egg proteins and prevent them from binding too tightly. When this happens, the moisture is pushed out and you get hard-boiled, rubbery eggs. If you forget to add salt beforehand, add it just before the eggs enter the pan. But if you plan to add the salt at the same time you start preheating the pan, you’ll be golden. Speaking of preheating…

Be patient, then work quickly. A sufficiently preheated pan will help prevent the eggs from sticking, so the eggs will begin to cook as soon as they touch the pan. As Cook’s Illustrated notes, preheating your pan slowly leads to more even heat throughout the pan — and gives you a bigger window to add your eggs without overcooking them. While the magazine recommends low heat, I prefer medium heat for a slightly faster but no less even result. When using medium-high heat, according to Roux’s recipe in our archives that I worked on, I found more color variation in the omelet than I wanted, as well as a tendency to overcooking. If you’re a confident cook who likes a little more puff and color for the omelet, you can use medium-high heat as long as you factor in the higher heat with your timing.

This is where the quick work part comes in. Once your pan has been preheated and you’ve poured in the egg, it’s time to get up to speed. Quickly stir the eggs to evenly distribute the heat and cook them all. Once the curd begins to form, stop. Work quickly around the pan, lifting the edge of the caught eggs and tilting the pan so that the liquid drips into the gaps in the sides. This method gives you a smooth and pretty exterior. The whole process should take no more than a minute and a half.

How to Get Perfect Sunny Eggs Every Time

Pay attention to the toppings. Because the omelet itself sets so quickly, says López-Alt, any toppings that need to be softened should be fully or mostly cooked ahead of time, because they don’t cook while on the eggs. You can do this in the pan while your salted eggs sit in a bowl or in a separate pan. Mixing the hot ingredients with the cheese will also help start the melting. Then spread your filling over half of the eggs while they are still in the pan just before removing it from the heat.

Let the eggs finish heating. Once you’ve completed the tilting step, let the pan sit on the heat until the eggs are almost completely set. They will still look wet but should not run. This is the point where it’s easy to let the eggs overcook, which is why I like López-Alt’s suggestion to remove the pan from the heat and then cover the pan to let the eggs finish in the residual heat . Simply fold in half (or in thirds, if that’s your thing) and serve. The result: a creamy and smooth omelette.

You may need to practice and perfect, but it won’t be long before you have your very own omelet station at home.

Classic Restaurant Style Omelette

Omelets are simple to make and easy to mess up, so we’ve got a recipe for you with some clever tips to ensure success. Salting the eggs a little before cooking and then letting them finish drying out ensures a tender result without overcooking.

For tips on how to turn this into a stuffed omelette, see the VARIATION below.

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  • 3 large eggs
  • Fine salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • Fresh herbs for garnish, such as thyme leaves, chopped chives, or chopped parsley (optional)

Crack the eggs into a small bowl, season lightly with salt and pepper and, using a fork, whisk lightly to combine. Let them sit for at least 10 minutes (15 is even better) while you heat the pan and prepare any toppings (see VARIATION). Salting ahead helps keep eggs tender while cooking.

Heat an 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat. Be sure to give it plenty of time to ensure the eggs start cooking right away. A few drops of water brushed against the surface should slide off and evaporate immediately. Add the butter to melt, stirring to coat the bottom and sides of the pan.

Pour the eggs into the skillet and allow the mixture to set for 10-20 seconds, then use a spatula to begin stirring the mixture, stirring until curds begin to form. Lift the edges of the clotted egg and tilt the pan to let the uncooked egg fill in the gaps.

Repeat the process as you go around the entire pan. This part should take no longer than 60-90 seconds. When the omelette has set at the bottom but still looks slightly moist but not runny on top, remove the pan from the heat and cover it with a tight-fitting lid or plate. Let stand until eggs have reached desired consistency, 1 to 2 minutes.

Use a spatula to fold the omelette in half and transfer it to a plate. Sprinkle herbs on top, if using, and serve hot.

VARIATION: You can use this recipe to make your choice of stuffed omelet. The vegetables won’t cook enough in the omelet, so you’ll want to sauté them in butter or oil first, over medium to medium-high heat. Transfer to a bowl, where you can mix with grated or crumbled cheese, if desired. When the eggs are almost done, sprinkle your topping over half of the omelette before removing from the heat and covering to let rest. Then fold in half and serve.

Calories: 158; Total fat: 13 g; Saturated fat: 6g; Cholesterol: 294mg; Sodium: 204mg; Carbohydrates: 1g; Dietary fiber: 0g; Sugar: 0g; Protein: 9g

This analysis is an estimate based on the available ingredients and this preparation. It should not replace the advice of a dietitian or nutritionist.

Based on a recipe adapted by Andreas Viestad from “Eggs,” by Michel Roux (John Wiley & Sons, 2006), as well as a recipe for “The Food Lab” by J. Kenji López-Alt (WW Norton, 2015).

Tested by Becky Crystal; questions by e-mail to voraciously@washpost.com.

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Max Verstappen reacts to Charles Leclerc’s pole position at the French GP | F1 | sport https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/max-verstappen-reacts-to-charles-leclercs-pole-position-at-the-french-gp-f1-sport/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 15:16:00 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/max-verstappen-reacts-to-charles-leclercs-pole-position-at-the-french-gp-f1-sport/ Max Verstappen has stressed that Red Bull can still challenge Charles Leclerc and Ferrari for victory in tomorrow’s French Grand Prix despite missing out on pole position. The defending champion revealed his car was “quick on the straights”, which the team could use to their advantage over Ferrari in the race. He admitted qualifying was […]]]>

Max Verstappen has stressed that Red Bull can still challenge Charles Leclerc and Ferrari for victory in tomorrow’s French Grand Prix despite missing out on pole position. The defending champion revealed his car was “quick on the straights”, which the team could use to their advantage over Ferrari in the race.

He admitted qualifying was “a little trickier” than he expected after being on the pace all weekend. The Dutchman was fastest in FP3 this morning but couldn’t convert his earlier advantage to pole position.

He said: “Well, FP3 doesn’t qualify clearly. Overall I think we were lacking a bit in qualifying, just general grip. It was a little trickier than I would have thought. hoped for, but overall we still have a decent race car.”

“Hopefully tomorrow works in our favour, we are quick on the straights so we can use it tomorrow. Obviously they were very quick again.”

READ MORE: Leclerc explained why he ‘has the edge’ over Verstappen at French GP

Verstappen was only eight thousandths of a second slower than Leclerc after his first run in Q3. The Dutchman was able to go faster in his second moto but couldn’t get ahead of the Ferrari after some shrewd Prancing Horse tactics.

With Carlos Sainz already penalized on the grid for tomorrow’s race, he slowed down to give Leclerc a giant tow on the Mistral straight. This allowed the Monegasque to gain speed, which allowed him to edge Verstappen by three tenths.

Red Bull appeared to have favorable race pace over Ferrari in yesterday’s long runs which could see the advantage change for tomorrow’s Grand Prix. The team is also looking to have a slight advantage down the straights, which should help with passing on the backstretch.

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After the session, Christian Horner consoled Verstappen via team radio as the team principal blamed the wind for the loss of pole.

He said: “Slightly unfavorable wind on this lap, front row though – good job.” Verstappen replied: “Yeah, it was a bit tricky that last lap but that’s okay.”

Later, Horner admitted the team could have been closer to Ferrari without the tow, but added the result was unlikely to change.

The Red Bull boss explained: “I think we could have been a tenth or a tenth and a half closer [without it], but just above that lap Ferrari had the advantage over us today. We have two very different concepts to attack this circuit this weekend; Ferrari has a bit more downforce and we are a bit more balanced.

“To have both cars up there, we have two against one, which is always an interesting strategic dynamic.”

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A weekend getaway guide to Montreal https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/a-weekend-getaway-guide-to-montreal/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 01:58:45 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/a-weekend-getaway-guide-to-montreal/ A weekend is all you need to fall in love with this city’s historic neighborhoods, thriving art venues and great food. Share this article A trip to Montreal can be a bit exotic at first: Am I in Europe? Canada? Should I speak in French or English, or both? The short answer is yes. Montreal […]]]>

A weekend is all you need to fall in love with this city’s historic neighborhoods, thriving art venues and great food.

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A trip to Montreal can be a bit exotic at first: Am I in Europe? Canada? Should I speak in French or English, or both? The short answer is yes. Montreal looks like a bit of everything, especially when you explore its distinctive neighborhoods.

A visit to Canada’s second largest city is approximately living in the urban space, meet the inhabitants, and share a moment. just pass Old Montreal, where you can admire the historic side of the city with architecture dating back to its founding in 1642. Or spend time in the bohemian Plateau Mont-Royal district, which attracts young artists and students thanks in part to proximity to McGill University.

Montreal is also eating, of course. With one of the highest number of restaurants per capita in North America, the city has in recent decades moved away from classic French and Italian cuisine to unleash its creative spirit. Most chefs are happy to champion farmers and local produce on their menus for a taste of the whole province, from land to sea. (Although you’d be sorry if you didn’t try the smoked meats .) Independent bakeries, cafes, specialty food shops and restaurants thrive in every neighborhood – you’ll want to pack your stretchy pants.

The colorful facade of Hotel Le Germain stands out among the skyscrapers that surround it.

Where to stay in Montreal

Hotel Le Germain

Book now: Hotel Le Germain

Inspired by the mid-century modern aesthetic of the 1960s, Hotel Le Germain’s 2019 renovations transformed this downtown property into a stylish space with exceptional service. Visitors are greeted at the 100-room hotel by the rainbow-hued facade created by artist Michelle Hoogveld as part of the Wall festival, an annual event that champions urban art. Rooms offer stunning views of Mount Royal or the skyscrapers along the street, and depending on the room, accents range from round beds to hanging bubble chairs.

Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth

Book now: Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth

Old-world charm and modern amenities reign at this grand downtown hotel that has hosted royalty and celebrities since 1958. It’s where John Lennon and Yoko Ono hosted a famous bed-in a week in Suite 1742. The hotel underwent a renovation in 2017; the result is a new Fairmont Gold (Gold) within a hotel, with a dedicated 21st-floor guest lounge and separate concierge services, and updated guest rooms (there are 950) with modernist details As geometric patterned floors and bold retro colors. The hotel is also putting on a special new Cirque Eloize cabaret show which is a wild affair.

Hotel Gault

Book now: Hotel Gault

On a quiet, cobblestone street in Old Montreal, this historic 19th-century building is adorned with intricate moldings and cast-iron columns that stand in stark contrast to the 30 minimalist-style lofts and suites it houses, with sweeping views of the town.

Epik Hotel

Book now: Epik Hotel

With just 10 rooms and suites, Épik’s renovations retained architectural details that date back to the 1700s, such as wooden beams and stone walls, offset by sleek modern design elements like LED lights. and rain showers. The hotel in Old Montreal is close to sites like the Notre-Dame Basilica, eclectic shops, and plenty of restaurants, so you won’t have to travel far to experience the city’s vibrant offerings.

Larrys is one of many restaurants vying for your brunch reservation.

Where to eat and drink in Montreal

Where to go for brunch

Montrealers love brunch and the city offers many great options. Olive et Gourmando du Vieux-Montréal is a must for its puff pastries and its “Egg on your Face” breakfast sandwich. For a more British twist, Larrys is the place to go. Don’t skip the scones! Other great brunch choices include modern Lebanese cuisine at Shay, charcuterie classics (and the best pancakes) at Arthurs, and French brasserie fare at Leméac. For a classic Montreal-style brunch, head to Beautys. The charcuterie has been serving bagels and Montreal smoked salmon platters since 1942.

Where to go for lunch

For lunch, you’ll have to feast on some of Montreal’s most iconic dishes: piping hot bagels (sweeter, crunchier and, dare I say, better than New York bagels), poutine or a sandwich smoked meat a mile high. These Montreal specialties are the best of their kind.

For a sweet snack, try the chocolate babka from Hof ​​Kelsten or the lemon tart from Pâtisserie Rhubarbe.

Where to go for dinner

If you’re in town for a few days, head to Candide, a restaurant inside the presbytery of a converted church, for regional cuisine. You are almost guaranteed to try unique ingredients from Quebec’s wild terroir. Its wine list is one of the best in town. If the weather is good, try to snag a table on the pretty terrace located in a quiet lane. Otherwise, the bar with a view of the kitchen action is the best place.

If you crave fine French cuisine, La Chronique and its bright dining room is a great place to spend an evening. His foie gras specialties and his service are always impeccable.

Vin Mon Lapin is a gem of a neighborhood restaurant in Little Italy with a beautiful dining room, fun and knowledgeable staff, an outstanding collection of great bottles (some of which you won’t find anywhere else), and the best produce. inventive and seasonal. dishes served in small dishes to share. It is imperative!

Old Montreal is a small piece of Europe that you can find on this side of the Atlantic.

What to do in Montreal

Explore Old Montreal

With its cobblestone walkways and century-old buildings, Old Montreal arguably has some of the most European streets this side of the Eiffel Tower. Locals and tourists wander its charming narrow streets to enjoy some of the city’s top attractions. Charismatic Saint-Paul Street, Montreal’s former main artery, is flanked by the historic 19eBuildings from the last century are now home to art galleries, kitschy tourist shops and glamorous restaurants.

One of Old Montreal’s main landmarks is the Notre-Dame Basilica, built in the neo-Gothic style between 1824 and 1829 (the steeples were finalized in 1843). Get tickets for Will have, an immersive sound and light show that showcases the basilica’s intricately carved wooden details and stained glass windows. For other memorable experiences, head to the PHI Center, a multidisciplinary art gallery featuring immersive exhibits using virtual reality.

You can admire panoramic views of Old Montreal and the river from several places, including the Montreal Ferris wheel, the iconic clock tower that overlooks the beach in Old Montreal or the spectacular Notre-Dame-de- Well, 300 years old. -Secours Chapel.

For a relaxing afternoon, book a massage at Bota Bota, an award-winning floating thermal spa housed inside a repurposed ferry with views of the famous Habitat 67.

Go downtown

From Old Montreal, it’s just a short walk through Chinatown to Quartier des Spectacles, a neighborhood in downtown Montreal that’s the city’s “cultural heart.” Some of Montreal’s biggest festivals take place here, especially during the summer when you can catch a Montreal Jazz Festival concert, a Just for Laughs show, or one of the many free outdoor activities.

If you love shopping, head west on Sainte-Catherine Street to McGill Avenue and beyond for world-class shopping above and below ground in the city Montreal underground. The pedestrian network that connects malls, subway stations and dozens of downtown buildings stretches 20 miles beneath downtown and is a great way to enjoy a day away from the vagaries of Mother Nature. .

Discover the Mile End

The Mile-End has the well-deserved reputation of being the trendiest neighborhood in Canada; its vibrant arts and music scene is home to many independent music stores, boutiques and bookstores. Mimic the locals as you browse Drawn & Quarterly’s stacks of books, then head to Café Olimpico for a latte and a few people watching on its terrace.

Hike or drive through Mount Royal Park to Beaver Lake for a panoramic view of the city. If you’re around on a Sunday, head to the George-Étienne Cartier monument and the tam-tams du Mont Royal, where you can find a spontaneous gathering of drummers and percussionists, the epitome of Montreal eccentricity.

Stop at Little Italy

From the Mile-End, it’s a short walk to Little Italy. Stop at an Italian cafe before heading to Jean-Talon Market, one of the largest open-air farmers’ markets in North America and a great place to grab lunch and stock up on edible souvenirs ( like Quebec maple syrup).

Visit Space for Life

Space for Life is the largest science museum complex in Canada and combines several experiences under one roof, or rather in the same neighborhood. You can gaze at the stars at the state-of-the-art planetarium, meet the smallest creatures at the insectarium, observe animals in the immersive ecosystems of the biodome or stroll through the botanical gardens. Montreal’s famous Olympic Stadium, home of the 1976 Olympics, is in the same neighborhood.

Cycling in town

Montreal has over 430 miles of bike paths and has been named one of the most bike-friendly cities in North America. Rent a bike or grab a BIXI (short-term rental) and ride along the Lachine Canal or around Parc Jean Drapeau for two scenic tours.

>>Next: Toronto is the perfect weekend getaway for adventurous eaters

The products we write about are independently reviewed and recommended by our editors. AFAR may earn a commission if you purchase through our links, which helps support our independent publishing.

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G20 finance talks end without joint statement: officials https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/g20-finance-talks-end-without-joint-statement-officials/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 05:20:15 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/g20-finance-talks-end-without-joint-statement-officials/ Published on: 07/16/2022 – 07:20Amended: 07/16/2022 – 07:18 Bali (Indonesia) (AFP) – A two-day meeting of G20 finance ministers in Indonesia is set to end on Saturday without a joint statement, two officials said, after Russia’s war in Ukraine overshadowed the proceedings. In talks on the Indonesian resort island of Bali, Western finance chiefs accused […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Bali (Indonesia) (AFP) – A two-day meeting of G20 finance ministers in Indonesia is set to end on Saturday without a joint statement, two officials said, after Russia’s war in Ukraine overshadowed the proceedings.

In talks on the Indonesian resort island of Bali, Western finance chiefs accused Russian technocrats of complicity in the invasion.

US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and Australian Treasurer Jim Chalmers on Friday blamed the invasion for sending shock waves through the global economy.

Instead of an official statement, there will be a statement from Indonesia, which holds the G20 presidency, said an official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Another source present at the meeting said the host would summarize the talks in a statement that would not fall under the G20 banner.

Indonesian officials did not respond to a request for comment.

At the start of the second day of talks, Indonesian central bank governor Perry Warjiyo called on ministers and world finance leaders to focus on recovery in a global economy still reeling from the Covid-19 pandemic. 19.

“It is important that we stay focused on what we set out to achieve this year, as it will also send a positive message to the global community about the G20’s role and efforts in supporting global recovery,” Warjiyo said.

But the talks took place in the shadow of the war in Ukraine – which Russia calls a “special military operation” – after it rattled global markets, caused food prices to rise and added to inflation. vertiginous.

It left the forum unable to agree on text with Russia at odds with Western nations over its invasion of Ukraine being the cause of global economic headwinds.

The Kremlin instead blames subsequent Western sanctions for blocking food shipments and rising energy prices.

“Russia tried to say that the world economic situation had nothing to do with the war,” a source from the French delegation told AFP on Friday.

Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov and Ukrainian Finance Minister Serhiy Marchenko participated virtually in the meeting.

Russian Deputy Finance Minister Timur Maksimov attended the talks in person.

He was in the room when Western officials expressed their condemnation, according to a source present at the talks.

Marchenko said the Russian invasion “clearly marks the end of the existing world order” and called for “tougher targeted sanctions” against Moscow.

Members will also discuss sustainable finance, cryptocurrencies and international taxation on Saturday.

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Twelve is a love letter to New England cuisine https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/twelve-is-a-love-letter-to-new-england-cuisine/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 00:50:31 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/twelve-is-a-love-letter-to-new-england-cuisine/ New Housed in a historic building rebuilt brick-by-brick on the waterfront, Twelve entices with more than a dozen reasons to dine in Maine. Passionate foodies and catering newbies love The Feed. Subscribe now to our bi-weekly newsletter. Picture provided You’d think news of a splashy restaurant opening in mid-July in the foodie capital of Portland, […]]]>

New

Housed in a historic building rebuilt brick-by-brick on the waterfront, Twelve entices with more than a dozen reasons to dine in Maine.


Picture provided

You’d think news of a splashy restaurant opening in mid-July in the foodie capital of Portland, Maine would start with the kitchen. But, taking inspiration from Executive Chef Colin Wyatt, let’s focus on the backstory of the brick stunner that houses the new restaurant, Twelve, as he likes. “I feel like the restaurant needs to live up to the name of the building,” Wyatt says, “and we need to honor its history.”

And what a story. Originally built 127 years ago as part of the Portland Company’s train factory, the structure was known as “Building 12: Pattern Storehouse”, where employees constructed gears and cogs of trains. The townspeople still call it the “Twelve”. It turns out that the only way to rehabilitate the old factory was to literally take the building apart brick by brick and rebuild it into its new waterfront home.

Sounds exhausting, right? But the team’s laser focus on found beauty makes perfect sense, given the “modern New England” menu at the 2,000-square-foot, 85-seat spot, which is the latest venture in the Prentice Hotel Group. “The main focus of each dish is an ingredient of [the region], mostly from Maine if we can,” says Wyatt. “Twelve,” too, alludes to seasonality and months of the year, as the rotating dishes feature sustainable produce sourced in high season from area farmers’ markets, as well as protein sourced from fish and vegetable suppliers. local farms. If the meal is building-wide, ingredients such as fresh oysters from Chebeague Island Oystersyoghurt Dairy and creameryand beef from Caldwell Farms are the individual and precious bricks.

The main menu served in the dining room is a four-course prix-fixe delight from $82 a pop, with larger a la carte options on the terrace and at the bar, where you can sip wines and cocktails. international with local ingredients. The prix-fixe trip opens with a small bite — “A little thank you for coming,” Wyatt says — with a savory gougère inspired by oyster chowder on the opening menu. Next, the “market” vegetable course celebrates seasonal Maine produce, such as fresh zucchini with candied lemon and rye. Then savor one of three starters, which are smaller crudos, tartars or hot vegetable dishes. The inaugural menu features deer tartare developed by chef Hannah Ryder and served with charcoal cream. Which begs the question, of course: what is charcoal cream? The chef burns a container of cream with a glowing charcoal, then the mixture is strained and seasoned with lactic acid, resulting in a fluffy cream that sings with light smoke and acidity.

For the main event, three or four starters focus on meat, fish, or larger vegetable offerings. Check out the monkfish with trout roe and peas, which swims in a rich broth of melted whey with butter, plus chive oil and fresh chives added to the mix. Hen of the woods mushrooms are glazed in boletus broth, with meaty, umami bites cut by fermented mustard greens. End on a sweet note – say the chocolate pudding everyone will love, served at the table with all the trimmings for a homemade dessert. “We also like to take a look at some of the French-Canadian and Yankee New England traditions that the rest of the country may not be very familiar with, but people here are familiar with,” says Wyatt. Expect a lobster roll, of course, but also a chance to experience some lesser-known terrain. Take the ployes, or Franco-Acadian buckwheat pancakes popular in northern Maine, which replace classic blinis in Twelve’s caviar service. Also, your fall forecast? Pack a cable knit sweater for a weekend and dive into the next potato pie served with savory frosting and cheese.

Wyatt worked on the menu for about two years after joining the project in 2020, which was a bit of a homecoming. He had worked in Portland before, then moved to New York for about 13 years, where he worked at Eleven Madison Park and DANIEL. Returning to Maine, where his wife Selena grew up, was always in the cards, with the pandemic moving up that timeline. General manager Daniel Gorlas, formerly of famed Central Park restaurant Per Se, insisted on a fixed price. The team bounced around four or five menu ideas before the current incarnation. However, some plates turned out perfect from the get-go, like pastry chef Georgia Macon’s salty flirt ice cream sandwich, made with cornmeal crackers and blueberry bay leaf ice cream. “Right before I hired her, she did a tasting for us,” Wyatt explains. “As soon as I tried one, I was like, ‘Okay, this has got to be on the menu. “”

Inside the restaurant, the decor forged by L. Bonime Design forgoes faux finishes in favor of a clean, coastal palette and natural materials — reclaimed beams, brass, large oak tables — that will age over time. Also no wonder Maine creatives take to the main stage with an installation by the artist Christina Watcaseven-seater chef’s counter stools by the cabinetmaker Heide Martinand personalized plates by Meg Walsh of C&M Ceramics.

As if we needed another motivation to go to Maine this summer and beyond. But for the people of Portland? “We really want to be a restaurant for Mainers,” says Wyatt. “It’s important for us to engage the local crowd and keep them coming for some really great food.”

Tuesday through Saturday, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. 115 Thames St., Portland, Maine, twelvemaine.com.

Cod - simmered with whey and trout roe twelve restaurant portland

Cod – slow cooked with whey and trout roe. Picture provided

Maple ice cream sandwich with chocolate and cocoa nibs twelve portland restaurant

Maple ice cream sandwich with chocolate and cocoa chips. Picture provided

twelve restaurant portland

Detail of barnacle walls created by Christina Watka. Picture provided

twelve restaurant portland

Mermaid wall lamp. Picture provided

Golden Potato Pie - Glazed with Cheddar and Mizuna Twelve Portland Restaurant

Spring vegetable salad. Picture provided

Golden Potato Pie - Glazed with Cheddar and Mizuna Twelve Portland Restaurant

Golden Potato Pie. Picture provided

Cod, Seasonal Vegetables, Glazed Potato Tartlet and Hake twelve portland restaurant

Cod, Seasonal Vegetables, Glazed Potato Tartlet and Hake. Picture provided

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Jay will organize the trail and garden cleanup on Tuesday in French Falls https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/jay-will-organize-the-trail-and-garden-cleanup-on-tuesday-in-french-falls/ Mon, 11 Jul 2022 23:05:55 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/jay-will-organize-the-trail-and-garden-cleanup-on-tuesday-in-french-falls/ JAY — Volunteers are needed to help clean up four trails and a garden at French Falls Family Recreation Park from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday. The park is on French Falls Lane, across Community Drive off Route 4. Volunteers are needed to help clean up trails and a garden at French Falls Family […]]]>

JAY — Volunteers are needed to help clean up four trails and a garden at French Falls Family Recreation Park from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday. The park is on French Falls Lane, across Community Drive off Route 4.

Volunteers are needed to help clean up trails and a garden at French Falls Family Recreation Park in Jay from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday. A series of summer concerts will begin on August 13 at the park. Photo of the town of Jay

People are asked to bring hand gardening tools if they have them. There will be something for everyone to do, said City Manager Shiloh LaFrenière.

The recreation committee sponsors a series of free concerts called Music in the Park. The first will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. on August 13 at the park with a performance by Darby Sabin. The Ugly Dumpling food truck will be present at the event.

People can bring lawn chairs or blankets to sit on and enjoy the music.

A second concert is scheduled for September 17 with a community barbecue and the band Matt and the Barnburners. The time is yet to be determined.

The Back Woods Road band were scheduled to play Saturday but had to cancel due to COVID-19, LaFrenière said Monday afternoon.


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