French Bread – Le Physalis Restaurant http://lephysalisrestaurant.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:04:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-140x136.png French Bread – Le Physalis Restaurant http://lephysalisrestaurant.com/ 32 32 What to do with Thanksgiving leftovers: 25 recipes for the next day https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/what-to-do-with-thanksgiving-leftovers-25-recipes-for-the-next-day/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:04:38 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/what-to-do-with-thanksgiving-leftovers-25-recipes-for-the-next-day/ ACROSS AMERICA – Throwing out Thanksgiving dinner leftovers is like doubling the trash cans and landfills into dollar bills. Grocery costs are on average about 12% higher than this time last year, and a traditional Thanksgiving dinner is estimated to cost 20% more this year. Why waste a single delicious morsel? We’ve rounded up 21 […]]]>

ACROSS AMERICA – Throwing out Thanksgiving dinner leftovers is like doubling the trash cans and landfills into dollar bills.

Grocery costs are on average about 12% higher than this time last year, and a traditional Thanksgiving dinner is estimated to cost 20% more this year.

Why waste a single delicious morsel? We’ve rounded up 21 recipes to turn your Thanksgiving leftovers into something completely different.

Find out what’s happening in Across Americawith free real-time Patch updates.

(By the way, the United States has an abysmal record on food waste, especially among people with comfortable lifestyles and healthy diets, according to a report published two years ago by the American Journal of Agricultural Economics Americans waste $240 billion worth of food each year—39.1% of the food brought in from the grocery store.)

Some things to keep in mind when deciding not to waste food this year:

Find out what’s happening in Across Americawith free real-time Patch updates.

  • As a general rule, Thanksgiving leftovers will keep for three to four days in the refrigerator. If your guests are staying all weekend, most items on your menu should still be good to eat for the entire duration.
  • For Thanksgiving dinner, enjoy salads and breads that wilt and dry out quickly.
  • According to the Food Network, leftover turkey, casseroles and cooked cereal freeze well for up to three months, provided you use bags specifically marked for storage or freezing.
  • Whether refrigerating or freezing leftover turkeys, remove the stuffing from the poultry cavity and store separately.

Of course, reinventing Thanksgiving dinner with creative leftovers can be part of the fun. Below are 25 takes you might not have considered that will turn your leftovers into something completely different.

Cranberry sauce is a dish people want for Thanksgiving, but not necessarily in the days after the holidays.

One way to use up leftover whole bean cranberry sauce is to quickly make Cranberry Brie Bites, a recipe from Ahead of Thyme. You will also need frozen puff pastry (or your own pastry if you are making it yourself), brie cheese, pecans (or walnuts, slivered almonds, pine nuts or pistachios) and fresh rosemary.

For Cranberry Sauce Muffins, a recipe from Foxes Love Lemons, you’ll use many of the basic ingredients that most cooks have on hand – flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, sugar, and vanilla extract – as well as butter, orange zest, eggs and sour cream.

For Cranberry Turkey Quesadillas, a recipe from Diethood, you will need flour tortillas, slices of provolone cheese, and leftover turkey and cranberry sauce. (Chicken or ham can be substituted.)

Kudos to the cranberries

If none of these recipes do it for you, why not just turn cranberries into a cocktail of cranberry sauce and bourbon? For this recipe from The Roasted Root, you will need homemade or store-bought cranberry sauce, bourbon, ginger beer or club soda, and a wedge of lemon. And, yes, if the sauce is made with whole berries, the cocktail could contain bits of fruit, which the recipe creator says is part of the fun.

This recipe for Brazilian cuisine On board a cocktail of leftover cranberry sauce, you will need cachaça, triple sec, fresh ginger and club soda.

For this recipe for Moscow Mule Cranberry Sauce from Food, you will also need some fresh limes, honey, vodka, ginger beer, cinnamon sticks and fresh cranberries, for garnish.

For Feast and West Old Fashioned Cranberry Sauce Cocktail you will also need a good quality bourbon, bitters (cinnamon, Angostura aromatic bitters, orange bitters or clove bitters) , orange zest and burnt rosemary.

And what’s a fancy cocktail without a platter of charcuterie, anchored by antipasto skewers made from leftover salads and platters of relish? The Food Network tells you how to make them. In advance, get ciliegine mozzarella (cherry-sized balls of mozzarella), fine salami and fresh basil.

We love this idea of ​​leftover mashed potatoes, Louis XVI potato croquettes from Fine Dining Lovers. A light and crispy vegetarian snack, it uses nutmeg, white pepper and parmesan cheese.

Brunch the next day

Cranberry cocktails are also great for brunch, but you’ll need some food.

This crustless ham and leek quiche recipe from Country Living Magazine is a great way to use up leftover ham from Thanksgiving. Besides the leeks and ham, you will also need an onion, kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, eggs, fresh cream, whole milk, Dijon mustard, Gruyere cheese, fresh chives and fresh parsley.

Another quiche option: leftover stuffing and cheese quiche, from Insanely Good Recipes. You will need butter, milk, eggs, cheese and a little leftover turkey or other meat.

For people who really like turkey dressing, leftover stuffed waffles are another option. You will need a waffle maker for this recipe, also from the Food Network, as well as eggs and parsley. Top with warmed mashed potatoes and gravy and a dollop of cranberry sauce.

Sweet potato pancakes are also perfect for brunch. Besides the mashed sweet potatoes, you will need sour cream, milk, eggs, maple syrup, flour, baking powder, baking soda, kosher salt, nutmeg, and cinnamon for this Serious Eats recipe.

Not Grandma’s Leftovers

Let’s move on to the rest of the day. This Thanksgiving Leftover Casserole recipe from Favorite Family Recipes started as a way for the creator to avoid having a fridge full of plastic containers. Best of all, you’ll get most of what you need, but you need to make sure you have some cheddar on hand.

The Spruce Eats offered a turkey burrito smothered in gravy. You will need leftover turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing and gravy, as well as flour tortillas, sour cream, cheddar cheese and chopped parsley, for garnish. Cranberry sauce can also be added.

For Leftover Turkey and Stuffed Pepper Stuffing, a recipe from Delish, you will need leftover turkey and stuffing, eggs, red and yellow peppers, shredded mozzarella, kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper and fresh parsley, for garnish.

Butterball Foodservice offers this recipe for Moroccan-spiced turkey salad. In addition to the leftover turkey, you will need plain Greek yogurt, cumin seeds, slivered almonds, lemon zest, honey, cinnamon, dried apricots and salt. Serve it on rye bread with watercress or baby arugula.

For the Coconut Turkey Curry, another recipe from Ahead of Thyme, you will need leftover turkey, onion, garlic and ginger, coconut milk, turkey broth, sugar, lime juice, a green pepper, fresh cilantro and steamed rice to serve.

This recipe for a Thanksgiving Turkey Po’ Boy sandwich shared a few years ago in The Washington Post is based on the concoction served once a year at the Parkway Bakery & Tavern in New Orleans. You will need Leidenheimer French loaves (or any other New Orleans-style 11-inch French loaf), 7 ounces of turkey, 12 ounces of stuffing, 4 ounces of sauce, and 4 ounces of whole cranberry sauce .

Sweet Potato Soup with Blue Corn Tortillas, another Food Network recipe, also calls for low-sodium chicken broth, ground ginger, allspice, freshly grated nutmeg, sour cream, mashed adobo, black pepper and fresh cilantro and crushed blue corn tortilla chips For garnish.

If you’re planning on making a casserole of string beans and anticipating leftovers, get some puff pastry sheets from the frozen aisles of the supermarket, so you can make a main course, Second Day Turkey and String Bean Pot Pies, also from the Food Network. Besides leftover casseroles and pastries, you’ll need milk, broth, and turkey.

This Thanksgiving pizza recipe from The Gunny Sack gets rid of a lot of your leftovers all at once. You will use leftover mashed potatoes, corn, green bean casserole, turkey, and stuffing and this recipe. He also calls for a sheet of puff pastry, cheddar cheese, fried onions, freshly ground pepper and basil, parsley or thyme, for garnish.

Reinvented desserts

Pumpkin Pie S’mores, another recipe from Delish, offers a different take on a staple Thanksgiving dessert. Make sure you have marshmallow sticks handy. You will also need graham crackers, Hershey’s chocolate bars, marshmallows and hot caramel for drizzling.

Speaking of dessert, you probably didn’t see it coming: leftover mashed potatoes are stuffed for a savory imitation of Heavenly Homemakers Peppermint Homemade Patties. Besides the leftover potatoes, you will need butter, peppermint extract, powdered sugar, chocolate chips, and coconut oil.

Who knew there were so many sweets using potatoes? Mashed Potato Brownies, an offering from Farmer’s Wife Rambles, calls for unseasoned (i.e. no garlic or pepper) mashed potatoes, butter, unsweetened chocolate squares, sugared eggs, vanilla extract, salt, flour and, optionally, semi-sweet chocolate chips and chopped walnuts or pecans.


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Jake Smith: Game to try something new with game? | GO https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/jake-smith-game-to-try-something-new-with-game-go/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/jake-smith-game-to-try-something-new-with-game-go/ It happens every year. You live here. You know. Like an enchanted sailor cradled by a bewitching mermaid, we put on shorts and a t-shirt on this November day at over 65 degrees, the rarest of the few. Maybe, we say, this will be the year it stays that way until May. And all the […]]]>

It happens every year. You live here. You know. Like an enchanted sailor cradled by a bewitching mermaid, we put on shorts and a t-shirt on this November day at over 65 degrees, the rarest of the few. Maybe, we say, this will be the year it stays that way until May. And all the while, we ignorantly sail toward the craggy rocks of Destiny – another northern Michigan winter.

Okay, I beat that analogy to death, but we fall for it every year. A sunny November day, wow that’s awesome, then an upside down slap of reality in the form of half a foot of snow.

“Hey,” Winter said, “remember me?”

Wild game is filling freezers right now, especially with gun deer season in full swing, and cooking in the winter is all about comfort food. To me, that means one thing: a slow cooker. In fact, I enjoy side snow as long as I’m tucked away in a kitchen filled with the savory wild game goodness emanating from the slow cooker.

And the best part is that it doesn’t have to be complicated. There’s something about ‘wild game’ that we’ve come to understand as ‘gourmet’, which makes it scary to cook for fear of spoiling it. That’s why, when I saw a press release for an upcoming cookbook, I reached out to its author – hunter, fisherman, social media personality and cook Jenn Danella – to choose her mastermind, because the title of his book jumped out at me. : “The wild game cookbook of the week.”

“I love creating family recipes and helping people elevate their wild game dinners,” she told me. Although she had no chef training, she started out like most of us, mixing her passion for hunting and fishing with her love of food and cooking.

“As my mother would tell you, I was obsessed with food as a child. I came home from school and immediately asked, ‘What are we eating?’ Eventually, we started cooking and trying new recipes together, which reignited my love for experimentation in the kitchen.

Browsing through the recipes on Danella’s website – and anticipating more in the book, published just before Christmas – I had a feeling they might be magic bullets for many wild game intimidated sportsmen. Danella has prepared classic meals with easy-to-find ingredients while using our favorite game, all of which can be simply prepared for a weeknight. And for this time of year, I asked him to use the slow cooker.

“I love using slow cookers for wild game because not only does it help tenderize the meat, it also brings out the flavor in the dish.”

Undertaking the butchery process yourself involves more preparation of the meat before assembling the slow cooker pot recipe, especially with the venison, and some advance planning.

“I make sure to let the meat thaw completely in the fridge,” recommends Danella, “and then remove all fat and silver skin from the wild game, with a few exceptions like duck fat.”

I usually sear a cut of meat before placing it in the slow cooker if I want to slice it afterwards, such as pork loin or venison tenderloin; I won’t grab the smaller cuts or the ones I want to knock off.

“Searing the meat before putting it in the slow cooker isn’t a game-changer for me,” Danella said. “Although searing first creates a nice caramelized surface that results in richer flavors, sometimes I’m pressed for time and still get delicious, tender dinners.”

If searing, season generously with your favorite spices, perhaps sauté some onions and mushrooms first to flavor the oil a bit, heat it up, press the meat into the oil on all sides and drop it in the slow cooker – but you’re not done. Lots of flavor stays in the pan.

Add beef or chicken broth to deglaze, scrape the entire bottom of the pan, add a combination of liquids you think will taste good together, and boil to half the starting volume. Swirl a few rounds of butter around, make sure to scrape the pan one last time, then pour everything into the slow cooker. I tend to group lighter liquids with lighter meat (white wine, chicken broth, lemon juice, white balsamic vinegar, etc. with pheasants), and darker liquids with darker meat (beef broth, soy sauce, red wine, Worcestershire, bourbon, etc..with venison).

Slow cookers aren’t those magical devices where you can just throw it all away and forget about it.

“I think people don’t always use enough liquid, which dries out the meal. A good rule of thumb is to completely cover everything in the slow cooker.

And in making the ubiquitous game stew that fills the house with those rich aromas, Danella has a simple trick to amp up the veggies.

“I like to add my vegetables later so they don’t get mushy. If you are going to add the vegetables at the same time, be sure to cut them into large slices.

But slow cookers can do so much more than stews. Venison fillets, shredded goose breasts, pheasants and dumplings… it’s time to diversify this winter. One of Danella’s favourites?

“French Slow Cooker Dip!” Sometimes soups and stews get boring in the winter, and this is a great quick meal to change things up. It’s as easy as it gets without missing out on flavor.

What I have enjoyed about Danella’s recipes is her use of simple, readily available ingredients, including the assortment of ‘cream of’ soups, especially for weekday evening meals. While I would rather waste time in the kitchen making things from scratch and messing up every pot and pan in the house, I also agree that music practice, dance practice, quiz, driver training , voice lessons, college meetings and deadlines mean we live in a take-out house.

“In a perfect world, I’d make everything from scratch,” Danella said, but she enjoys using soup mixes and canned custards in recipes. “They can save time and pack in flavor.”

But when do you have time?

“It’s actually quite simple to make your own cream of soup. You start by creating a roux by whisking together the melted butter and flour. Then you slowly whisk the chicken broth [or beef broth] and milk. Then simply season with garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper! It only takes five or six minutes and you can be as creative as you want with the seasonings.

For those of us in northern Michigan, we can add “a freezing, windy, terribly endless winter” between death and taxes to the list of things that are certain. So break out the slow cooker, find a new twist on a favorite gaming recipe, and fill the kitchen with the bounty you’ve worked so hard for this season. It will chase away the cold.

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Emmaüs’ new sandwich shop is creating a buzz | Lehigh Valley Regional News https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/emmaus-new-sandwich-shop-is-creating-a-buzz-lehigh-valley-regional-news/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 17:39:00 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/emmaus-new-sandwich-shop-is-creating-a-buzz-lehigh-valley-regional-news/ EMMAUS, Pa. — A new sandwich shop is creating a lot of buzz in Lehigh County. The Hive, offering made-to-order sandwiches and premium sides, opened Thursday at 417 Chestnut St. in Emmaus, just off the triangle. Hive partners George Younes, Pete Rodriguez, Edwin Lugo and Robert Sirmans pose inside their newly opened sandwich shop at […]]]>

EMMAUS, Pa. — A new sandwich shop is creating a lot of buzz in Lehigh County.

The Hive, offering made-to-order sandwiches and premium sides, opened Thursday at 417 Chestnut St. in Emmaus, just off the triangle.






Hive partners George Younes, Pete Rodriguez, Edwin Lugo and Robert Sirmans pose inside their newly opened sandwich shop at Emmaus




Partners George Younes, Edwin Lugo, Robert Sirmans and Pete Rodriguez spent five months renovating the space with new flooring, windows, ceiling tiles, shiplap walls, electrical work and equipment of the kitchen.

The store’s name refers to Emmaus High School’s mascot, the hornet, Younes said. There are other school nods with green trim and an Emmaus High School football helmet on display.

“We are thrilled to be part of the Emmaus community,” Younes said. “We love meeting everyone who walks through our door, and we listen to what they like and hope to see on our menu as it expands.”

The store, which seats about six customers, offers sandwiches like Italian, tuna, and turkey and ham.

The sandwiches feature Dietz & Watson meats and cheeses and are served on French bread from Egypt Star Bakery alongside.

Pricing starts at $19.99 for a whole (24 inches), $9.99 for a half (12 inches), and $8.49 for a pita bread.

Depending on customer hunger, whole sandwiches are usually enough for four people, Younes said.







The Beehive

La Ruche, a newly opened sandwich shop at Emmaüs, offers whole 24-inch sandwiches.




The team is also considering replacing the half size with 7 and 14 inch sizes.

“So we would have a small and a medium instead of a half,” Younes said. “The reason we’re considering doing this is because a lot of customers are halving the halves.”

As well as using Egypt Star bread, The Hive also sources other local produce, including pita from Soumaya & Sons Bakery & Deli in Whitehall Township and coffee – a medium roast blend dubbed “Bound for Glory” – from Monocacy Coffee Co. in Bethlehem.

“We hope to partner with many more local businesses as we grow in the new year,” Younes said.

During its soft open, cold sandwiches are offered with sides such as coleslaw and cheddar macaroni salad. The hummus is made from scratch by Younes’ mother.

“I’m from Syria and I’ve been eating this hummus since I was a kid,” Younes said. “It’s the absolute best, and I’m thrilled our customers can now enjoy it.”

Starting in a few weeks, hot sandwiches like pulled pork, Cuban and other paninis will be offered, Younes said.

Customers can also expect egg, meat and cheese sandwiches on Egypt Star’s Kaiser rolls from early 2023.







The Beehive

The Hive, offering made-to-order sandwiches and premium sides, opened Thursday at 417 Chestnut St. in Emmaus, just off the triangle.




“We’re looking to add something new every week,” Younes said. “We’re also looking to introduce a new chicken Caesar sandwich and other sides like Asian coleslaw.”

Hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. In the coming months, the hours will change from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. from Tuesday to Saturday and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday. Information: 610-772-9722.

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The GameDay countdown is coming to Raritan https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/the-gameday-countdown-is-coming-to-raritan/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 17:54:57 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/the-gameday-countdown-is-coming-to-raritan/ The countdown to Block GameDay takes us tonight to Raritan where the Rockets host Rumson-Fair Haven in the NJSIAA South Jersey Group 2 Championship Game. The top-seeded Rockets (8-2) beat Middle Township and Pleasantville to reach the section final as they seek their third title and first since 2015. Meanwhile, the visiting Bulldogs (6- 4) […]]]>

The countdown to Block GameDay takes us tonight to Raritan where the Rockets host Rumson-Fair Haven in the NJSIAA South Jersey Group 2 Championship Game.

The top-seeded Rockets (8-2) beat Middle Township and Pleasantville to reach the section final as they seek their third title and first since 2015. Meanwhile, the visiting Bulldogs (6- 4) are pretty much regulars in the final. and are chasing their seventh overall title with the last in 2018. Rumson knocked out Monmouth and Oakcrest and allowed just six points in the two playoff games.

The winner of this All-Shore game will advance to the first-ever Group 2 semi-final next weekend against Gloucester City or Willingboro.

At halftime of the game, the Shore Sports Network will present a special award to Raritan HS for being voted as having the best football concession stand in the Shore Conference. The Rockets will receive a trophy and a $250 gift card from Jersey Mike’s who sponsored the online voting contest.

time permits, if you’re headed to the game, look for the Shore Sports Network SUV next to the concession stand and stop by and sign up to win a $100 “block box” of 100% all-natural premium meat and more . Everything comes from The Butcher’s Block Butcher & Long Branch Table who stormed the Shore.

You can register until half-time and then between the 3rd & 4e quarters, we will ask the PA announcer to read out the name of a randomly selected person who will win the $100 “block box”. Also follow us on Facebook Shore Sports Network page as I will be providing a decorator for the game as well as updates throughout the evening.

At the end of the game, we will award The Butcher’s Block MVP award.

Where to find the juiciest burgers on the Jersey Shore

Sometimes you just need a solid burger.

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Cooking Thanksgiving dinner? Get organized. https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/cooking-thanksgiving-dinner-get-organized/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 21:11:46 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/cooking-thanksgiving-dinner-get-organized/ Mirepoix – a mixture of celery, carrots and onions – can be chopped large or small, depending on how the cook uses it. Getting organized before cooking Thanksgiving dinner will help the day flow more smoothly. Photos: Bill St. John. In a typical year — three of which we haven’t seen recently — Thanksgiving dinner […]]]>
Mirepoix – a mixture of celery, carrots and onions – can be chopped large or small, depending on how the cook uses it. Getting organized before cooking Thanksgiving dinner will help the day flow more smoothly. Photos: Bill St. John.

In a typical year — three of which we haven’t seen recently — Thanksgiving dinner is often the biggest annual family meal a cook prepares. The most intimidating; the most complex; the most agitated.

It doesn’t have to be all that – well, except always the greatest. It could be rather daily, in truth; it just requires planning.

“Mise en place” is kitchen French for “planning”. (It’s French-French for “to put in place” or “everything in its place.”) It really is France’s greatest gift to the kitchen since butter.

“Setting up” means having a well-stocked pantry and freezer. Or shop ahead to fill them. It is a question of cutting, before cooking, all the vegetables and other food to be cooked. It is about portioning and having at hand, in small bowls or on plates, all foods, fats, flavors, seasonings, liquids, etc., everything intended for heat. Before lighting the flame.

“Set up” means “everything on the counter, where I can see it, ready to go”. Thus, if all establishment is in place, all you have to do is cook, eat and clean. And relaxation. That’s the point.

“What I find people do when cooking for a group, like at Thanksgiving,” says Jamey Fader, longtime Denver chef and culinary director at Marczyk Fine Foods, “concerns with so many fine details that everything catches them.

“Keep it simple,” he reminds. “Concentrate on ‘It’s good’. Cook only five dishes, for example, not 14.”

“Get into the right headspace,” says Fader, “which means being relaxed and organized.” He and I both agree that ‘organized’ is simply English for ‘putting in place’.

Fader takes particular pride in cleaning as you go, so that “in the end, once everyone has eaten, all you have to do is put the plates in the washing machine.” As an example, he says that after mashing the potatoes, “put them in a serving dish that you will keep warm, then immediately wash the pot in which you boiled them and put it away” . In a sense, the serving platter of mashed potatoes then becomes part of the “mise en mise” of that dinner.

“Mirepoix [a mix of celery, carrots and onions] can be cut into different sizes in advance to suit different uses,” says Fader. “I lay my roasting turkey on large pieces of mirepoix and use smaller cuts in the stuffing.”

Other Fader suggestions for setting up Thanksgiving: “Peel the potatoes and put them in water.” (Can be made several days ahead if using the refrigerator.) “Never throw away leftover vegetable peelings; they go into storage, either for now or, if you freeze them, for the future. (This includes onion skins which will impart their light brown color to lighter stocks such as those made from fish or poultry.)

Like some cooks, Fader cooks two turkeys for Thanksgiving. “One is for that day,” he says, “and the other is for the two leftovers to send home with others,” as well as future inventory. Anthony Bourdain was also known for preparing double turkeys, one “stuntwoman” for the table, dressed “like a dancer”, and the second in the kitchen, already cut up and ready to be served.

Additional Fader Day Ideas: “I like to make buttery orange glazed sweet potatoes,” he says, “and always cook the stuffing outside of the bird.” (As with mashed potatoes, once the stuffing is cooked, ideally in its serving container, “just keep it warm and that’s one less thing to worry about.”)

I asked Fader about a common concern of mine, adding too much salt to a dish, something that cannot be removed. “Always season [add salt and freshly ground pepper] at the end,” he says, the seasoned chef’s way of avoiding oversalting from the start.

“The only solution for oversalting is volume,” he says. “If there’s too much salt in the stuffing, tear up Parker House rolls and roll out the stuffing. Too much salt in the sauce? Add more broth or broth. Nothing can hide too much salt. Adding volume is all that works.

Stock of Roasted Chicken Carcasses

Prepare it well before Thanksgiving dinner, to use in soup, as a humectant for stuffing, and as a base for sauces. Or, alternatively, use the turkey carcass of the day in place of the chickens in the recipe to make broth for use in the future. Makes 2-3 pints.

Ingredients

2 roast chicken carcasses (not raw), golden skin OK

2 medium onions, peeled, halved along their “equators”

3 celery stalks (leaves OK), halved

2 medium carrots, washed and halved

4 garlic cloves, unpeeled but crushed

6 stalks of parsley

2 sprigs of fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon of dried thyme

1 bay leaf

directions

Separate or cut roast chicken carcasses into pieces, especially at the joints, the more pieces the better. Put aside. Sear the 4 onion halves over medium-low heat in the pan (unoiled) you will use to make the broth until the cut sides are golden brown.

Put the chicken pieces and all the remaining ingredients back and cover with 2 inches of water. Bring to a gentle boil, then simmer, partially covered, for 3 to 4 hours, skimming off any fat or foam that may rise and topping up with boiling water, if necessary, to keep everything submerged.

Strain the broth, through a cheesecloth if you want it clearer. When cool enough to handle, remove the meat from the bones to use for other preparations. Cool it in the pan overnight so any fat that rises will freeze and can be skimmed off. Portion broth as desired and refrigerate for use within a week or freeze for long-term use.

When preparing Thanksgiving dinner, don't throw away vegetable peelings, even onion skins.  Instead, save them for stocks or broths.  Photo: Bill St. John.
Don’t throw away vegetable peelings, even onion skins, when preparing Thanksgiving dinner. Instead, save them for stocks or broths.

Gene Amole, the late and beloved Denver native, radio DJ and Rocky Mountain News columnist, wrote several dozen columns for this sadly defunct newspaper, but the one with his turkey stuffing recipe was the sizzle. According to an editor’s note in the November 4, 1982 edition, the recipe was “the most requested column in the Rocky Mountain News files.”

Her recipe is here, with directions in her own words.

Gene Amole’s Thanksgiving Turkey Stuffing

Ingredients

17 slices of white bread (or use a package of dry bread cubes)

3 slices of black Jewish pumpernickel (don’t leave it out)

1 tablespoon of salt

1 teaspoon of pepper

1 tablespoon sage, thyme or poultry seasoning

1/2 pound breakfast sausage

1/2 pound Italian sausage

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup chopped onion

1 cup chopped walnuts

3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

2 cups thickly sliced ​​mushrooms

1 tart apple (Granny Smith type), peeled, cored and chopped

1 cube of unsalted butter

2 cups chicken or turkey broth

3 tablespoons cream of sherry

directions

First, open a bottle of Harvey’s Bristol Cream Sherry. In fact, any brand will do, but Harvey’s is the best. Take yourself a small pinch, then pour exactly 8 ounces into a measuring cup. Set it aside while you prepare the other ingredients.

Take the bread slices and cut them into crouton-sized cubes and place them in a large mixing bowl. Sprinkle with pepper, salt and sage or poultry seasoning. Brown and crumble the two sausages in a skillet, out of their casings if necessary. After mixing the sausage well, remove it with a slotted spoon and put it in the large bowl.

Add celery, onion and walnuts; discard parsley and mushrooms. Add the apple pieces. I know what you think. You’re preoccupied with pumpernickel and Italian sausage. Just seems out of character, doesn’t it? Trust me. And you probably want to sauté the onions and celery. Don’t.

Every time I make this prank, I remember Chinese philosopher Lao-tze’s observation about bean sprouts. “They should be firm but flexible,” he wrote. The same goes for the celery and onions in this dressing. The nuts and the apple will also retain a nice freshness.

Heat the butter and broth together until the butter melts. Pour the liquid into the bowl. Do not mix yet. There is another important ingredient. You’re right! It’s sherry. Never forget the sherry. Very carefully pour 3 tablespoons of sherry into the bowl. Sip the sherry you have reserved in the measuring cup.

Gently stir the stuffing with two wooden spoons until all the ingredients are well combined. Don’t bruise the sausage! If the mixture is too dry, add lukewarm water. Food science no longer recommends stuffing the bird. We compose the recipe and cook it in a ceramic casserole dish. Guess that makes it dressing rather than stuffing – whatever you call it, it’s fine.

Revery Bill St John to [email protected]

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And for its next course, Colby College is focusing on food https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/and-for-its-next-course-colby-college-is-focusing-on-food/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 08:00:42 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/and-for-its-next-course-colby-college-is-focusing-on-food/ Danila Cannamela, a professor at Colby College, demonstrates making pasta for her lab class last year. Cannamela’s course, “Pastoral Cookbook,” was one of the reasons Colby’s Center for the Arts and Humanities chose “Food for Thought” as its theme for this academic year. Photo by Ben Wheeler WATERVILLE — In her class last fall — […]]]>

Danila Cannamela, a professor at Colby College, demonstrates making pasta for her lab class last year. Cannamela’s course, “Pastoral Cookbook,” was one of the reasons Colby’s Center for the Arts and Humanities chose “Food for Thought” as its theme for this academic year. Photo by Ben Wheeler

WATERVILLE — In her class last fall — titled “Pastoral Cookbook: Classic Recipes and New Cooking Techniques” — Colby Professor Danila Cannamela encouraged her students to consider a different approach to the concept of “pastoral.”

“We approached the pastoral as a recipe with four ingredients: root vegetables, milk, meat and honey,” Cannamela said of the lab course, which included hands-on cooking classes and visits to farms in the center of the country. Maine, and produced a “cookbook” of their findings.

“We played with goats, listened to the buzz of thousands of bees, and nibbled fruit straight from the vine,” reads part of the introduction to the cookbook that ends the class. “On farms, we slowed down: we couldn’t help but pay attention and appreciate the complex processes that bring us the food we eat every day.”

Cannamela, an assistant professor of Italian at Colby, called the course “one of the most rewarding experiences I’ve had as a teacher,” adding that students also had the opportunity to learn about PFAS issues facing Maine farms and supply chain struggles. bogging down the entire food production system, among other agricultural concerns.

“I think the students realized how much complexity there is behind this facade of beauty and simplicity that we see in a rural landscape,” Cannamela said. “They became more aware of the state of agriculture around us.”

Students rolled and cut homemade pasta for Professor Danila Cannamela’s food-themed lab class last year. Photo by Ben Wheeler

Cannamela’s class was part of the reason the faculty at Colby’s Center for the Arts and Humanities chose “Food for Thought” for its theme this year, bringing food-related inquiries to 16 classes in areas ranging from anthropology and Spanish to religious studies. Past themes, chosen in part to be broad enough for all of the Centre’s different disciplines to find a way into the discussion, have included last year’s “Freedom and Captivity” and the academic year’s “Frontiers and Margins”. 2020-21.

Colleges and universities have become increasingly interested in food studies over the past two decades. Popular programs have sprung up at Boston University (Food and Food Studies), Oregon State University (Food in Culture and Social Justice), and Tufts University (Agriculture, Food and environment), to name a few.

Although the Colby theme does not lead to a degree in food studies, it does allow this year’s students to use the subject of food as a springboard for meaningful discussions.

“When we were reflecting last year,” said Chris Walker, assistant professor of English and associate director of the Center for the Arts and Humanities, “one of the things that concerned us was the importance of food, to both in terms of structuring our cultural experience, and allowing us to connect with each other, but also how this is an increasingly important environmental issue. Food is really an issue that connects individual experience and global trends and issues.

Professor Cannamela, left, checks fresh pasta as it cooks for his lab class. Photo by Ben Wheeler

BEYOND SIMPLIST DEFINITIONS

“Food is such a rich theme,” acknowledged Center for the Arts and Humanities director Dean Allbritton. “It’s really about thinking about our relationship with food. The food we eat, whether we have access to food, indigenous communities and their relationship with food.

“Some courses offered this year address these issues and encourage students to move beyond simplistic definitions of food,” said Audrey Brunetaux, associate professor of French studies.

Brunetaux gave as an example her course this fall, “Matter for Thought: French Cuisine and Culinary Identities,” which she says “re-evaluates and critiques French cuisine and gastronomy through a decolonial lens to decenter the narrative on food and culinary traditions in France. .”

Beyond the courses, the Center organized a series of conferences, round tables and film screenings on food to highlight this year’s theme, such as a round table, open to the public, on “Food justice in Maine” at 7 p.m. Monday in the Kassman Hall. The roundtable will include perspectives from four Maine nonprofits: The Evening Sandwich Program; Coffee Stone Soup; Healthy Northern Kennebec; and Present! Maine.

Also free and open to the public: A screening of the film “What’s Cooking,” which explores Thanksgiving Day through the lens of four distinct families – Vietnamese, Latino, Jewish and African American – is scheduled for November 13 at the Maine Film Center , who regularly partners with Colby.

LESSONS FROM THE PANDEMIC

The Center has more events planned for later this month, and more food-themed assignments and curricular events are planned for the next semester, including an April campus visit from the vegan chef African American, food justice advocate and author Bryant Terry.

“Food means something different to each student,” Brunetaux said. “Some may think that food is an important way to bond within communities; some might see food as a political tool to address systemic injustices; others might see food as a catalyst for creativity and social justice.

Freshman Linh Tong said her class, “Investigating the History of the United States to 1865,” used this year’s theme to show how food helped shape the country and its people. inhabitants. “Food is not just a means of survival, food also has a lot of cultural value,” she said.

The class focused on particular food items here and there, like Native American fry bread, which Tong says has its roots in the European colonization of North America.

“The fried bread plays the role of food for the survivors, and they used it to survive during this time,” Tong added.

Colby teachers noted that this year’s food theme was also driven in part by the knowledge many of us have gained about dietary needs and issues during the pandemic.

“Food insecurity has increased during the pandemic,” Walker said. “We all missed getting together and eating together.”

“We are coming out of a time, in the pandemic and the lockdown, where a lot of us were thinking about food,” Allbritton said. “I remember trying to learn how to bake bread at the start of confinement. I think a lot of us think about how we access food and what happens when we don’t have the food we want or need.

“Right now, given the inflation problem, a lot of us are thinking about the cost of food every time we go to the grocery store or to a restaurant.”


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The Ultimate Guide to Chicago Italian Beef https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-chicago-italian-beef/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:07:30 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-chicago-italian-beef/ Finally, the Italian beef has a moment. While Chicago-style deep dishes and hot dogs have long gained national fame, Italian beef was one such dish with limited appeal outside of Chicagoland. But now publications like the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times suddenly care about our beloved soggy sandwich. We have “The Bear” […]]]>

Finally, the Italian beef has a moment. While Chicago-style deep dishes and hot dogs have long gained national fame, Italian beef was one such dish with limited appeal outside of Chicagoland. But now publications like the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times suddenly care about our beloved soggy sandwich.

We have “The Bear” to thank for that, the FX show that follows a fictional young chef who unexpectedly leaves the world of fine dining to take over his family’s classic Italian beef stand. Fellow Tribune food critic Louisa Chu was able to chat with the star, Jeremy Allen White, a few months ago about the performance.

While glad to see the interest coming from the coasts, no one knows beef like the people of Chicago. The Chicago Tribune has been covering this messy, meaty sandwich for years — here’s everything you need to know.

At its core, Italian beef is a thinly sliced ​​roast beef sandwich served with juices derived from the roasting process. (Depending on the stand, this liquid is called juice, jus, or sauce.) That makes it the rare sandwich where a liquid plays a vital role in the finished product, and also explains why words like “spongy,” “moist,” and ” soggy” are often used to describe Italian beef.

In this way, the Italian beef shares many similarities with the French dip, but unlike this LA creation, the jus isn’t served neatly on the side in a small cup for you to dip as you please. Instead, the bread is often briefly dipped or emphatically soaked in the juice.

The so-called French bread is mainly used. Typically this is done by Turano Baking Company, a large bakery based in the suburb of Berwyn.

Of course, that still doesn’t quite reflect what people love so much about the sandwich. As I once wrote, “this is a sandwich that begins with a bunch of humble ingredients, which are transformed, by sheer engineering skill, into one of the meatiest, messiest sandwiches around.” on earth”.

Customers enjoy sandwiches at the Taylor Street restaurant.

It’s controversial. In a 2014 Tribune article by Kevin Pang, food historian Bruce Kraig explained that the origin of the dish is “fuzzy at best”. But three stories come up often. The first is that Pasquale Scala invented the sandwich in the 1920s as a cheap option to serve at weddings. Shaving the beef and serving it with the roasting liquid helped “stretch the limited meat” that people could afford at the time. Scala then founded the Scala Packing Company, which sold Italian beef to many restaurants until very recently closing its doors.

The second story is almost identical, except it was Tony Ferreri. His grandson, Chris Pacelli Jr., told Pang, “He roasted the beef and cut it into paper thin slices so you could see through it and put it in sandwiches. So now 15 pounds of beef would serve 50 people instead of 20.” Ferrari’s son Albert Ferreri eventually opened Al’s Bar-BQ in 1938, which later changed its name to Al’s #1 Italian Beef.

The third option comes from the late Sun-Times food critic Pat Bruno, who thought it was only invented in 1948 or 1949 and was directly inspired by the French dip. But one cook, who is only called Tony, thought the French dip recipe was too boring, so he added more garlic and herbs.

Italian Beef at Al's #1 Beef $6.49

In the middle of 2020, I visited 50 Italian beef spots to find my top 20. Personally, I love the spice profile of the original Al’s #1 Italian Beef on Taylor Street. Rounding out my top five are Johnnie’s Beef, Bob-O’s Hot Dogs, Portillo’s, and Jay’s Beef of Harwood Heights.

Italian beef special at Tempesta $12

Excellent question. Many of the best Italian beef stalls have been around for decades. But that doesn’t mean chefs aren’t experimenting with the concept. As I discovered a few years ago, chefs at restaurants like Gibsons Italia and Tempesta Market have tried using different cuts of beef and very untraditional types of bread, although these are generally only available occasionally.

Marciella Sichique prepares an Italian beef sandwich at Portillo's 100 W. Ontario, Wednesday, July 9, 2014.

Like most beloved regional sandwiches, an ordering shortcut has developed over time to speed up the transaction. Don’t stress about it. You will not be expelled if you make a mistake or ask a question. It’s not like trying to get ketchup on your hot dog at Jimmy’s Red Hots. But the jargon is useful because it helps you easily customize the sandwich. Start by simply calling it “an ox.” There is no American beef or Norwegian beef vying for your attention.

As explained above, the jus, or cooking liquid, is an integral part of the sandwich. The amount of beef juice that comes with the ride depends on how your order. (Although there is a general consensus on these terms, some stands use their own language.)

Dry: The meat is transferred to the bread with very little juice. If you hate clutter, this is the way to go. Of course, you also miss most of the excitement. One way to solve this problem is to order a cup of juice on the side, although you often have to pay extra to do so.

Italian Beef Sandwich at Portillo's 100 W. Ontario on Wednesday, July 9, 2014.

Wet: This is the lightly soaked option, with just enough liquid to soak the bread, but not to saturation point. Some places, like Portillo’s, pour in some of the juice to achieve the desired effect. A few places politely dip the cut side or one end of the bread in the juice before adding the meat. It’s a great compromise, especially if you’ve never tried the sandwich before.

Tempered: The beef is added to the bread, then part – or all – of the sandwich is dipped in the juice. It’s, frankly, a bit gratuitous and very messy, because there’s no way to eat this without smearing your hands in beef juice. That said, this is my favorite style because you get all the flavor of the beef jus as it saturates the bread. Just be sure to eat immediately, otherwise everything will turn to mush. Sometimes this style is referred to as “baptizing” your beef, although some believe that “dipped” refers to a slightly tighter dunk, while “baptized” indicates a more forceful dip.

Hot giardiniera at JP Graziano in Chicago, Wednesday, May 17, 2017.

It’s not like Subway or Chipotle, where you can load up a dozen different toppings. Honestly, if you find lettuce or tomato on Italian beef, I’ll ask you to refund me. Most places limit additions to sweet peppers, hot peppers, which you can label as mild and hot (or get both). But there are a few other toppings you might come across.

Sweet pepper: Luckily, these are mild peppers, not sweet. Sauteed or roasted green peppers are by far the most common choice, although sometimes places like Jay’s Beef of Harwood Heights use roasted red or yellow peppers (but not always). It’s common for places to cut the peppers into wide strips, although Johnnie’s Beef in Elmwood Park cuts them into small pieces, a move I think more places should adopt. They don’t add heat or flavor, but they never get in the way either.

Peppers: Also known as giardiniera, Chicago’s quintessential condiment, it’s made with lots of hot peppers and a few chopped vegetables like cauliflower, celery, and carrots. This mixture is marinated, drained and then immersed in oil. Spices range from pleasantly pungent to downright pungent. The Giardiniera is essential, helping to cut through the heaviness with a shock of heat and acid, and I refuse to eat one without it.

Cheese: Cheese is becoming an increasingly common Italian beef topping. Standard options include mozzarella, provolone, cheddar, and cheese sauce. A good argument can be made that the gooey, melted cheese overwhelms the flavor of the beef, but if you love it, don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Marinara: It’s even rarer, but a few stands allow you to add a thick, well-seasoned tomato sauce to your Italian beef. Having never experienced this variation, I tried Buona’s beef in sauce (formerly known as “the Rizzo way”, for Anthony Rizzo), which includes tomato sauce and mozzarella. It works surprisingly well, although it looks more like a meatball sub.

Combined : Most Italian beef stalls also sell grilled Italian sausage sandwiches, which are delicious on their own. Of course, this inevitably led to the combo, where you’ll get sausage and beef in the same sandwich. The result is obviously overdone, but if you’re in a good mood, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Johnnie’s Beef is the defending champion of this specialty.

Sauce bread: You can also ask for no toppings and no beef, which leaves you with a piece of bread soaked in jus. I doubt anyone would prefer this one over the one with beef, but it’s also much, much cheaper.

Plant-based Italian beef: What if you replaced the meat with a vegetable substitute? This is a relatively new addition to the scene, but this Italian “beefless” or plant-based beef can be found at Buona Beef and Can’t Believe It’s Not Meat.

Kind of. Finding the right kind of bread and toppings, especially in the Chicago area, is a breeze. You can also easily roast beef, and the Tribune has published a few recipes over the years. But the problem comes when you try to slice the meat. Italian beef shops use an electric deli slicer, which allows them to get those incredibly thin slices. Not many people have one at home, which means you’ll have to make do with a very sharp knife. I have tried this many times and am never able to maintain consistently thin slices. That doesn’t mean people don’t serve Italian beef at home, but why not leave the pros at a local Italian grocery store. The real pleasure is to eat.

nkindelsperger@chicagotribune.com

Big screen or home broadcast, take-out or dine-in, Tribune’s writers are here to guide you to your next big experience. Sign up for your Free Weekly Eat. Look. Do. newsletter here.

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Thank goodness Doyle’s Pour House in Barnegat, NJ isn’t closing https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/thank-goodness-doyles-pour-house-in-barnegat-nj-isnt-closing/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 09:23:18 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/thank-goodness-doyles-pour-house-in-barnegat-nj-isnt-closing/ There was some confusion over the weekend on their Doyle’s For House Facebook page. Everyone was wondering what was going on. I have friends who go here every week and everyone was confused. Announcement of Doyle’s Pour House on Facebook: To all of our wonderful guests, family and friends, we wanted to thank you for […]]]>

There was some confusion over the weekend on their Doyle’s For House Facebook page.

Everyone was wondering what was going on. I have friends who go here every week and everyone was confused.

Announcement of Doyle’s Pour House on Facebook:

To all of our wonderful guests, family and friends, we wanted to thank you for your continued patronage at our wonderful Doyle’s in Barnegat. Doyle’s is and will always be in our hearts and minds forever. We have decided to move on, and this will be our last weekend together. You will all be in our thoughts and prayers, thank you again for such wonderful memories. Going nowhere in particular, and we don’t say goodbye…until we meet again. I hope to see you by the end of Tuesday. Have a wonderful day Barnegat, Ocean County and beyond.

When we all read this, there was a gasp of “closure”, wasn’t there? On Facebook, there was so much confusion and people just wondering if Doyle was shutting down forever. I can see why so many people would think that.

Doyle fans, their announcement was just a bit of a jerk, they’re not closing, just new owners taking over. I know the owners have been there for a while and I don’t know who the new owner(s) are, but I’m sure we’ll all love Doyle’s as much as we do now. I’m just glad they don’t close their doors.

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C-viche restaurant sets opening date in Shorewood https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/c-viche-restaurant-sets-opening-date-in-shorewood/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 22:03:02 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/c-viche-restaurant-sets-opening-date-in-shorewood/ C-viche restaurant, which serves Peruvian, Mexican and Latin specialties, opens its Shorewood restaurant in November. Karlos Soriano, originally from Peru, owns the restaurant along with Paco Villar, originally from Mexico. Soriano said the Shorewood restaurant is set to open at 4330 N. Oakland Ave. November 15. It’s still possible the opening could be delayed ― […]]]>

C-viche restaurant, which serves Peruvian, Mexican and Latin specialties, opens its Shorewood restaurant in November.

Karlos Soriano, originally from Peru, owns the restaurant along with Paco Villar, originally from Mexico. Soriano said the Shorewood restaurant is set to open at 4330 N. Oakland Ave. November 15.

It’s still possible the opening could be delayed ― the partners originally thought the restaurant would launch in the summer of 2021, but pandemic-related supply chain issues have disrupted the schedule. But Soriano said the restaurant could also open earlier than planned; C-viche would announce any changes on its Facebook and Instagram pages.

The design of the Shorewood restaurant will be similar to that of the original C-viche restaurant at 2165 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. in Milwaukee, with two major differences.

The Shorewood location will have an open kitchen and ceviche bar, where four customers at a time can sit and watch the cook behind the counter prepare their ceviche or Nikkei sushi to order. (A large Japanese population in Peru has influenced the country’s cuisine.)

“That’s what we have in Peru,” Soriano said of the ceviche bar. “It’s fresh and it’s right there,” he said of the fish dishes, so customers can see that menu items are cooked to order.

The Nikkei ceviche and sushi bar allows customers to peek into Shorewood's C-viche kitchen and see their freshly prepared orders.

Shorewood’s menu will be the same as Bay View’s, with dishes such as lomo saltado, the sautéed steak dish with tomato, onion and fries; chicken enchiladas with green sauce; and scallop tacos. Main course prices range from around $13 for a vegetable pasta dish to $56 for an Argentinian churrasco.

The restaurant plans to launch Sunday brunch later.

Hours of operation will be 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Happy hour will be from 4-6 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday at the eight-seat bar only, with $7 drink specials and $10 tapas, like anticuchos, ahi tuna ceviche, and scampi with prawns with chimichurri butter toast.

C-viche will also offer take-out and online ordering at c-viche.com.

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Thanksgiving traditions and memorable meals https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/thanksgiving-traditions-and-memorable-meals/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 17:41:00 +0000 https://lephysalisrestaurant.com/thanksgiving-traditions-and-memorable-meals/ MISSION, Kan., October 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — (Family Features) Beginning with parades and ending with family meals, Thanksgiving offers all-day opportunities to celebrate life’s special moments with those closest and dearest to your heart. . Turkey and cranberry buns Waking up to watch Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade is a tradition that brings smiles and happiness to […]]]>

MISSION, Kan., October 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — (Family Features) Beginning with parades and ending with family meals, Thanksgiving offers all-day opportunities to celebrate life’s special moments with those closest and dearest to your heart. .

Waking up to watch Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade is a tradition that brings smiles and happiness to many families, and this year an iconic brand will be joining the festivities. Since 1921, Wonder Bread has captured the “wonder” of its founder Elmer Cline experienced when I first watched a hot air balloon race. He is often credited with popularizing sandwich bread in United States and now, for the first time, his legacy will be exposed November 24 parade through the streets of New York City.

To celebrate the special occasion and the joy that Thanksgiving brings, you can enjoy Turkey with Cranberries as a delicious home-cooked meal that’s as easy to prepare as it is easy to share. If you’re looking for a savory side that will delight your loved ones, look no further than this Thanksgiving stuffing, a classic side dish to holiday meals and a favorite of home chefs across the country.

To learn more about Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade and find family favorite recipes suitable for Thanksgiving feasts, visit wonderbread.com/macys-parade.

Turkey and cranberry buns

Non-stick cooking spray
1 pack of Wonder Dinner Rolls
2 cups diced turkey, cooked
1 cup cranberry sauce or relish
6 slices of Swiss cheese
6 tablespoons of butter
1 tablespoon of yellow mustard
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tablespoon dried minced onion
salt, to taste
Pepper to taste
1 tbsp parsley
1 cup parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 325 F. Cover a 9×13-inch baking dish with foil and spray with nonstick cooking spray.

Remove the rolls from the packaging in one piece, cutting the entire slab in half lengthwise to create half “tops” and half “bottoms”.

Place bottom half in foil lined pan and top with turkey, cranberry sauce and Swiss cheese. Add the top half of the rolls.

In the microwave, melt the butter and stir in the mustard, Worcestershire sauce, onion and salt and pepper to taste. Pour evenly over rolls.

Cover with foil and let stand 5-10 minutes then bake, covered, 20 minutes. Uncover and cook for 5 minutes.

Sprinkle with parsley and parmesan. Slice into individual rolls.

Thanksgiving prank

1/2 cup unsalted butter, divided
3 cups chopped onion
2 1/2 cups chopped celery
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
2 teaspoons of celery seeds
1 pinch grated nutmeg
1 pinch ground cloves
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 loaf Wonder Classic White Bread, cubed
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 cups low-salt chicken broth

Heat the oven to 325 F.

In a large skillet over medium heat, melt 1/4 cup butter. Add the onion, celery, garlic, sage, thyme, celery seed, nutmeg, cloves and salt.

Cover and cook until the onions are tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from fire.

In a large bowl, mix the sautéed vegetables with the bread cubes and season with pepper. Melt the rest of the butter and pour over the stuffing with the broth, then toss to coat well.

Bake, covered, until heated through, about 35 minutes. Uncover and bake an additional 15 minutes.

Michael French
[email protected]
1-888-824-3337
editors.familyfeatures.com

About Family Features Editorial Syndicate

The leading source of high-quality food, lifestyle and home & garden content, Family Features provides readers with tips, takeaways, information, recipes, videos, infographics and more. . Find articles and additional information on Culinary.net and eLivingToday.com.

SOURCE Family Feature Editorial Syndicate

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